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Lifelines Photic Stimulator Excels in IPS Testing

Lifelines Neurodiagnostic Systems’ Photic lamp has a bright future according to an article in the Journal of the Association of Neurophysiological Scientists (JANS).  The article Clinical Application of a New Strobe Lamp in Identifying Photosensitivity in Patients Referred to the Birmingham Children’s Hospital for EEG Testing was written by Bryony Carr, the Unimed Prize Winner of 2016, and was a published undergraduate BSc dissertation for the Birmingham Children’s Hospital, UK (Journal of the Association of Neurophysiological Scientists, Vol. 9, No. 2, pages 74-80 [2016]).

Carr’s prizewinning paper addressed the need to develop new guidelines for standardization of the intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) procedure to detect photosensitive epilepsy.  The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) publishes guidelines for the standardization of the IPS procedure, including the importance of the use of an optimum photic lamp. The Lifelines Photic meets all these requirements.

Grass strobe lamps were previously preferred, but are increasingly difficult to find.  In this study, these strobe lamps were compared to EEG systems with incorporated stimulators like the Lifelines Photic.  Introducing a photic stimulator compatible with current EEG systems, with optimum characteristics and proven sensitivity in the detection of photosensitivity, can bring researchers closer to a standardized IPS procedure.

In conclusion, the neurophysiology department at Birmingham Children’s Hospital, UK, incorporated the Lifelines lamp for IPS and states the “findings from this study were positive with statistical analysis supporting the hypothesis that the new Lifelines lamp is indeed as sensitive in photosensitivity detection as the previously favored Grass strobe lamp”.

“This standardization of procedure will, in turn, potentially lead to optimum patient care”.

For more information about the Lifelines Photic, please contact us at sales@lifelinesneuro.com or go to our website.


MORE INFORMATION:

Please refer to the Journal of the Association of Neurophysiological Scientists (JANS), Volume 9, Number 2 (2016) for the full article, Clinical Application of a New Strobe Lamp in Identifying Photosensitivity in Patients Referred to the Birmingham Children’s Hospital for EEG Testing, written by Bryony Carr.

Abstract

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder encompassing a variety of disorders characterized by recurrent and unpredictable interruptions of normal brain function known as seizures, brought on by a number of causes.  Photosensitive epilepsy is characterized by seizures elicited by flashing lights and is detected during electroencephalogram (EEG) testing during intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) by the presence of photoparoxysmal responses (PPR). Recent literature has seen the development of new guidelines developed for standardization of the IPS procedure, including the importance of the use of an optimum photic lamp. Previously favored Grass strobe lamps are becoming increasingly hard to find, and thus it is now desirable to purchase EEG systems with incorporated stimulators. The Neurophysiology department at Birmingham Children’s Hospital uses Micromed systems, incorporating a new compatible Lifelines lamp for IPS. This study anticipates that comparable sensitivity between the existing Grass strobe and new lamps will be achieved for detecting photosensitivity.

Method

A total of 57 patients were exposed to an IPS procedure from both lamps during standard EEG recording. The presence of a PPR upon exposure to either lamp was documented, with the paired data analyzed according to McNemar test.

Results

A total of 7 subjects (12%) were found to be photosensitive upon presentation of both lamps. A single subject (2%) was found to be photosensitive upon Grass strobe stimulation and not upon Lifelines’ lamp stimulation, and a single subject (2%) was found to be photosensitive upon stimulation with the Lifelines lamp and not with Grass strobe stimulation. The McNemar statistic calculated was 0.999, allowing investigators to assume, based on a small sample size, that the Lifelines lamp is as sensitive in photosensitivity detection as the Grass strobe lamp.

Conclusion

The study indicates positive outcome in the Lifelines lamp’s future use in the diagnostic detection of photosensitivity.